choctaw2ndedition2 choctaw2ndedition2 Choctaw Stickball | 2nd Edition - Episode 2
Location
Home / Articles / Wood Lacrosse Sticks / Choctaw Stickball Sticks | 2nd Edition - Episode 2

Choctaw Stickball Sticks | 2nd Edition - Episode 2

Choctaw Stickball Sticks | 2nd Edition - Episode 2

Choctaw stickball sticks

Welcome to the second update on my Choctaw stickball sticks project. My name is Justin Skaggs from Wood Lacrosse Sticks. Here, we are going to his cover the bending jig to flare out the stickball sticks. I call it ďThe Spine.Ē In my right hand, I have the first edition Choctaw stickball sticks. I always keep old stock for experimenting as I move forward, and I knew I was going to make some adjustments, so I kept a couple of these. What Iím gonna do is modify these so theyíre as close to correct as they can be so I can experiment with this jig. If this works, then Iím going to go ahead and create new staves and go through the trouble of making these accurate.

Choctaw stickball sticks

First things first, I have to modify this stick so it is actually going to give me a real representation of how the spine works. Iím going to cut this down and Iím going to make these cups a lot longer. Then, Iím going to put a hose clamp on it, which will create an effect where the base is braced, so when the stick is bent forward, itís bending as if the base is one solid piece. A lot of this information is coming from some my friends on social media, Brenner Billy and Clovis Hamilton. Remember to give them a follow. They are very talented stick makers, making them in the traditional fashion, and theyíve also taken a lot of time to give me this information in order to bridge my gap from novice to something a little bit more experienced.

Choctaw stickball sticks

When Iím done steaming them and think theyíre ready, Iím going to place the cup on the top and brace the front and back ends of it to the bottom of the spine, which Iím then going to lift up off the table. Thatís gonna allow me to adjust how much pressure is there and where the pressure is in an attempt to create a proper flare. So, in this experiment, obviously, Iíve lost a couple. I can already see some breaks that I donít like, but there are some promising results from a few of these sticks that weíve put through the test.

Choctaw stickball sticks

Iím gonna come back in Episode 3, analyze what I like and what I donít like, and if I feel like I can move forward, Iím gonna start developing the staves in the appropriate fashion and to the appropriate size.

Choctaw stickball sticks


Article Posted: 10/17/2019 11:47:48 AM

Related Articles

Indigenous Speakers Project | History of the Word

Indigenous Speakers Project | History of the Word

Article Posted: 09/19/2019 03:04:02 PM

How to Re-Bend a Wooden Lacrosse Stick

How to Re-Bend a Wooden Lacrosse Stick

Article Posted: 09/12/2019 03:31:01 PM

LACROSSE HISTORY: recent discovery Cherokee Stickball

A recent discovery in a cave just took place and it shows us how much we still have to learn about the game of lacrosse and its significance to the people who gave it to the world. This is Lacrosse History.

Article Posted: 05/08/2019 01:35:15 PM

LACROSSE HISTORY: Lacrosse in the Olympics

Lacrosse in the Olympics

Article Posted: 04/30/2019 11:02:01 AM

LACROSSE HISTORY: The world's oldest stick

I'm Justin Skaggs and I am a stick maker out of Philadelphia. I've been working on my craft and†going through my journey for some time now, and as part of my journey, I've†made it a point to do my homework and do research on the origin of†sticks from all around the world. Now, it’s time to spread my knowledge to you. This is Lacrosse History.Today, I want to discuss the world's oldest existing Lacrosse Stick. To be clear, this isn't me saying that this is the oldest lacrosse†sticks in terms of what was used throughout history, but rather†that this is the oldest surviving lacrosse stick in terms of something that you can go†see in a museum today.The oldest known stick is roughly 200 years old, dating back to 1823. You may think this stick is located somewhere in North America, it is not. In actuality, the stick is located in Italy. The stick was taken by an Italian explorer name Giacomo Costantino†Beltrami. He brought it back to his hometown of Bergamo, Italy, where it is†still located today. In fact, the stick is often referred to as The Beltrami Stick. This stick is a Great Lakes Style stick, so it is very similar to the sticks currently made by Minnesota-based lacrosse stick maker Max Kelsey.This is a game with deep origins from generations past, so I fully recognize that this is likely not the oldest lacrosse stick in existence, but so many of these antique items are difficult to time-stamp, and seeing as museums and archaeologists are so particular about when things are and can be dated, the Beltrami Stick gets this accolade.Until next time, make sure to let me know if you’d like to learn about anything in particular, and I’ll take a look into our archives. There are many more sources about this stick and other books (such as Minnesota Lacrosse: A History and North Country: The Making of MinnesotaLacrosse Legends of the First Americans) that I’ve pulled facts from down below. Until next time, take care, and keep LAXin’.

Article Posted: 04/23/2019 03:57:49 PM

Home  |  History  |  Contact  |  717.586.7378
Follow Us
Honor The Game
Wood Lacrosse Sticks
Your Cart
Your Cart: Empty
Search
Main Banner
blackfriday
blackfriday
blackfriday
Follow Us
© 2019 Wood Lacrosse Sticks, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2019 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.096397 Seconds Memory Usage: 5.588303 Megabytes
Kryptronic